Eye Care And Diabetes

High blood sugar can damage the tiny blood vessels in your eyes over time. that can lead to an eye disease called diabetic retinopathy. high blood sugar can also lead to cataracts and glaucoma. so…. Most notably, diabetes can result in diabetic retinopathy; an eye disease that affects the blood vessels in the all-important retina. nearly 45 percent of americans diagnosed with diabetes have some stage of diabetic retinopathy. that’s why there’s no separating diabetes and vision.. Even gestational diabetes and pre-diabetes increase the risk of diabetic eye disease. an estimated 40 to 45 percent of americans diagnosed with diabetes have some degree of diabetic retinopathy, according to the nei. that is why anyone with diabetes should have a comprehensive dilated eye exam at least once a year..

Every year, you should have an eye exam by an eye doctor (ophthalmologist or optometrist). choose an eye doctor who takes care of people with diabetes. your eye exam may include: dilating your eyes to allow a good view of the entire retina. only an eye doctor can do this exam. at times, special photographs of your retina may replace the dilated eye exam.. Due to the consistency in suboptimal eye care utilization among people with diabetes, systemic changes in health care may be needed. telemedicine may be one viable option, but other interventions could also simplify and improve the fractionated health care system so that eye care is a seamless part of diabetes care.. You may have heard that diabetes causes eye problems and may lead to blindness. people with diabetes do have a higher risk of blindness than people without diabetes. but most people who have diabetes have nothing more than minor eye disorders over time. with regular checkups, you can keep minor problems minor..

Anita Manning – APCO Worldwide

Eye care. people with diabetes are at lifelong risk for eye and vision problems, including diabetic retinopathy, cataracts, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and blindness. good control of glucose and blood pressure helps to prevent onset and reduce progression of diabetic retinopathy. in addition, early detection, monitoring, and treatment of retinopathy are essential to reducing the risk of blindness.. Whether you have type 1, type 2, or even just gestational diabetes, you are at risk for developing diabetic retinopathy. the longer you have had the disease, the greater the risk. it is essential to keep your blood sugar levels under control to prevent vision loss, and this may require a trip back to your primary care physician..

Whether you have type 1, type 2, or even just gestational diabetes, you are at risk for developing diabetic retinopathy. the longer you have had the disease, the greater the risk. it is essential to keep your blood sugar levels under control to prevent vision loss, and this may require a trip back to your primary care physician.. Most notably, diabetes can result in diabetic retinopathy; an eye disease that affects the blood vessels in the all-important retina. nearly 45 percent of americans diagnosed with diabetes have some stage of diabetic retinopathy. that’s why there’s no separating diabetes and vision.. You may have heard that diabetes causes eye problems and may lead to blindness. people with diabetes do have a higher risk of blindness than people without diabetes. but most people who have diabetes have nothing more than minor eye disorders over time. with regular checkups, you can keep minor problems minor..